DICK GREENWOOD
Builder, Broker, Explorer.
Director Builder Marketing
Dick.Greenwood@cbexchange.com
An article shared by permission
from Dick Greenwood. Dick
News & View. 08/22/16

A while back the Atlantic ran a major piece entitled “The American Lawn: A Eulogy”. As the title suggests, the American lawn, the symbol of suburbia has now outlived its purpose. As I have written in the past, we are being faced with a water shortage in many parts of the United States. In places like Nevada, they will pay you to take out sod and replace it with “native” landscaping. Once it’s removed, a deed restriction is placed on the lot and sod will never again be allowed on the lot. Conservationists say the first priority for water must be

Conservationists say the first priority for water must be humans, then agricultural – sod does not make the list. Building codes are being changed to say you can’t have non-native plantings. On T.V., they interviewed some government officials saying that sod is non-native to the United States. The seeds for most of the turf grasses in the U.S. comes from overseas. For example, Kentucky Bluegrass originally came from Europe and Northern Asia. Bermuda grass was originally from Africa and Zoysia grass was originally from east Asia. This means that while the grasses can certainly survive here, they will probably not, on their own survive. The lawn that most Americans want generally requires more water than natural rainfall provides. By EPA’s own estimate, nationwide we require 9 billion gallons a day to keep green. A 2005 NASA study derived from satellite imaging—the most recent study available— found that turf grasses took up nearly 2% of the entire surface of the continental U.S. There were in all, around 40 million acres of lawn in the continuous U.S., which meant that turf grasses took up roughly three times as much area as irrigated corn. This means that turf grasses—vegetables nobody eats—were the single largest irrigated crop in the country. Absurd. A trend that has developed in some western states like California,

A 2005 NASA study derived from satellite imaging—the most recent study available— found that turf grasses took up nearly 2% of the entire surface of the continental U.S. There were in all, around 40 million acres of lawn in the continuous U.S., which meant that turf grasses took up roughly three times as much area as irrigated corn. This means that turf grasses—vegetables nobody eats—were the single largest irrigated crop in the country. Absurd. A trend that has developed in some western states like California,

A trend that has developed in some western states like California, Arizona, and Nevada, where the government is paying people $1 to $4 per square foot to get rid of their lawns is expected to continue to grow.

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